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and girls, the rights and roles of women and girls a central focus of american foreign policy. and i didn't do it because it was a nice thing to do or it was some pet project of mine. i did it because the evidence is overwhelming. countries that deny political and social rights to women and girls are more unstable, more likely to breed extremism, more likely to threaten the united states. countries that deny economic opportunities to women and girls, rooted in education and business and investment are not going to be as prosperous as they might otherwise be. so it became clear that if i was going to be traveling around talking about diplomacy and development, urging changes in economic structures, introducing what we call economic statecraft to be a central pillar of our foreign policy you had to talk about women and girls and so i've tried to do that. >> restrictions on women's economic participation are costing us massive amounts of economic growth and income in every region of the world. >> this work, ensuring that women are equal partners, as they should be, and are free to realize th
and didn't because he was so, quote, strong on foreign policy. >> you say, quote. that's why i voted for him. i trusted george bush to make hard, tough decisions that i thought john kerry might waver on. >> thank you. which is why i don't think obama will have any problem with this. >> i think it helps him. >> he'll look like a strong, and just like he did a year ago, just like when he killed bin laden, he looks incredibly strong on foreign policy. and this will not provide a weak spot for him in the long run. >> mika, really quickly, i agree with you there. i don't think there's going to be a political fallout from it. >> yeah. >> i think one of the things that disturbs me so much is the fact that americans are not any more concerned about other americans being able to be targeted and killed without any due process. and i'll say it again because i can hear people saying, well, why didn't you say that about george w. bush? i did. i did on padilla. i did when there were americans whose constitutional rights were being eviscerated by what was going on during the bush era. i spoke out t
this oversimplification, but when you dig deeper, not so much. good so much of u.s. foreign policy has to do with what have you done for me lately or what can you do for me down the road. with that in mind, what does he need do for us -- what does haiti do for us? >> there has been a long time when we do not want a lot of haitians in southern florida. in early days haiti controlled an important slice of water, which gave naval access to the caribbean, so that mattered a lot in the old days and for military matters with latin america, but what can they do for us in the future? they cannot be unstable. also, there is a lot of business investment in haiti, and now haiti is being opened to mining interests, both canadian and u.s. mining interest. there is a huge amount of gold and silver and copper to be found underneath the surface, but people have not come in before because haitians will not allow them to come in on on fair terms, but those will be changed, and now mining companies can explore wherever they want. tavis: you talk about these organizations. have the ngos been good or bad for haiti? >> rel
in terms of foreign policy from the bush doctrine, from the bush era policies, but in many ways has followed them and has been handed this entire security apparatus, this particular program began in 2004, about 400 strikes have happened so far. about 3,000 people have been killed, mostly pakistan, somali, yemen. but you have had this sort of deafening silence for the most part from progressives and liberals around this. you have had a few voices certainly on the hill and even on your network to raise questions about it, but by and large, the president has been given something of a pass. i think also the public has moved beyond this in some ways. there's a post-9/11 new normal in terms of how the public looks at the prosecution of this war on terror. they see it, it seems to me, as a vast war, an endless war in some ways that might be best prosecuted in this way rather than those large land wars we saw in afghanistan and iraq of this sort of pinpointed targeting of folks seem so far to have found some positive backing from americans. >> the cover of "time" magazine is rise of the dro
adviser who can murder you on foreign policy. mexico mississippi? >> john: it's authorizations right here in the continental united states. an increasing number of congress is considering limiting the president's ability to kill on foreign soils. is there anything where we question this? >> you just did a great segment on handguns. the american public, we have a culture of fear. we're terrified of everything. that's why we own so many handguns. that's why we're so willing to allow this president to trample on our freedom because we are so afraid of everything. the language we're going to hear tomorrow is this is a dangerous world. it's the same language we hear all of the obama apologizists talking about, it's the same thing with george bush. this is a dangerous world has been focused to death. they know it scares the american public. we're going to hear it again. this is a culture that will not react until they understand that it affects them. by 2020, john, we're going to have 30,000 drones flying overhead on our domestic soil. it's because of this new idea if it's a drone it's probably
. it's a major component of his foreign policy. and listen, there is a difference between operational oversight, which is what congressman rogers was stressing in the interview with andrea mitchell, and legal oversight. and up until this point we really haven't seen any legal justification that the administration has presented for why it can target american civilians abroad if it has determined an imminent threat to the homeland. >> well, it was written today in the "new yorker" that the justification that they're using is a comparison to military troops going into cambodia in vietnam. that's how the nixon administration, they're making that comparison. i don't know how that's going to set with a lot of people. so i'm anxious to hear what mr. brennan does for justification tomorrow. sam? >> let me add one point to that which is the other thing the administration has done is well, we've been talking about this process, attorney general eric holder has been talking about this process. john brennan has been talking about this process publicly. we have outlined it. and i think there is a
. this is a major component of the president's war on terror. it's a major component of his foreign policy. and listen, there is a difference between operational oversight, which is what congressman rogers was stressing in the interview with andrea mitchell, and legal oversight. and up until this point we really haven't seen any legal justification that the administration has presented for why it can target american civilians abroad if it has determined an imminent threat to the homeland. >> well, it was written today in the "new yorker" that the justification that they're using is a comparison to military troops going into cambodia in vietnam. that's how the nixon aw incredie changes. ri and i think there is a role for congress to play. and i would add even for the american public to play to a certain extent in judging what kind of legal justifications the administration is using. i understand the administration doesn't want to set a bad precedent here, but these are weighty matters. >> colonel, what kind of intel are we getting on the ground? i mean we have to be sure that we're not kill
to kiss up to the americans. you don't have to follow the mubarak foreign policy record. you can actually do your own thing and iranian regime is seeing an opportunity to have a hand in bringing egypt in on their team. melissa: so how do you think that plays out? if they go in and offer the them the exact same support, who would they choose? >> well it depends on exactly how they want to go forward. remember the shoe throwing. what does that symbolize? at the core you have clerics also in egypt and morsi regime is obviously muslim brotherhood. they are very religious. they don't see the geopolitical advances here as a priority. they might see the sunni, shiite rivalry being more important. this trip was a slap in the face to the u.s. who is offering all this help to egypt there is also, the clerics have been repicking ahmadinejad and iranian regime you can't extend this shiite agenda throughout the region. melissa: we're not super popular there either. >> no, we're not. melissa: i don't know, are we necessarily anymore popular? >> this is the wake-up call for the americans, the u.s. admin
in the war on terror and is this legal architecture going to guide american foreign policy in perpetuity because there will always, i guarantee you, thomas, somewhere in the world be someone somewhere who is plotting to do something terrible to the united states, always. that is going to be absolutely the case. and if that is all it takes for us to be in a state of war, we will be in a state of war forever. >> isn't that the new ghormal of what we've evolved to in a country where we have been in a perpetual state of war for a dozen years now? >> yes, but i don't think it should be. i don't think the mere presence of somebody plotting to do something terrible to the united states should be the bar that triggers us being in a state of war. you know, england got hit, spain got hit by terrorist associated with al qaeda. that doesn't mean spain is in a permanent state of war. it doesn't mean england is in a permanent state of war. there are nations that have been targeted by truly genuinely mallef lent forces and it doesn't mean they reorder their thinking, their strategy, their legal archite
to president obama's foreign policy in as far as being able to take out terrorist where is he doesn't have to send u.s. troops and john brennan was an architect of that strategy. of course, controversial because there are innocent civilians who can get caught up in that as "the new york times" written about earlier this week, as well. that's obviously where some of this is coming from but the question americans face is would you rather have american troops and boots on the ground in yemen and pakistan or the unmanned drones taking on this responsibility? >> thank you very much. i appreciate you changing conversations in the middle of everything. we'll have plenty of time i'm sure to talk about chuck hagel. meantime, let's take the audience to the senate hearing and senator dianne feinstein. >> because of the added importance of having steady leadership at an organization that conducts most of its business outside of the public arena. intelligence is critical to the successful draw down in afghanistan, to the brutal war going on within's syria's borders, across north africa where the attack
or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? >> my -- >> yes or no. >> my reference to -- >> are you answering the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like to answer whether you were right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer -- >> well, let the record show that you refuse to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was senator john mccain grilling his old friend chuck hagel last week at hagel's confirmation hearing. the senate armed services committee was supposed to vote today on hagel's nomination to head the pentagon, but that vote has been postponed after republicans said they hadn't received sufficient information about hagel's financial records and specifically about any payments he's received from foreign sources. that's an odd hurdle given that republicans never seem concerned about f
't have a foreign policy that is delivered by leak to the american press. it's dangerous. we know it has cost us sources. we know it cost us operations. we know it put in jeopardy, at least a part of the time members of our special forces units that may have been involved in those raids. we had to protect their families. so it is really, really important that they get the notion that yes, foreign policy is hard but you have to sell it in a way that does not disclose classified information. and that's been concerning it me. i hope that they have gotten that message. i think today we'll hear a lot about that when the senate does their questioning of mr. brennan. jenna: congressman, thank you very much for the time today. i know it is a busy one as always for you in capitol hill. we always appreciate you joining us, thank you. >> thanks, jenna. jon: fascinating topics on the front burner today. one lawmaker calls senator marco rubio of florida a lynchpin in getting immigration reform done. we're going to take a look why that may be the case coming up. jenna: now a fox news weather alert for
hope you all look at the article written january 17 in "foreign policy" magazine about aegis and the problems that have surfaced about them. now i have talked to patrick kennedy about this and his staff has come over and briefed my staff that they believe aegis is doing just fine. . >> i won't go into the i.g. report on the background checks. but the people that are at kabul now, it is $100 million a year we are paying them. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. someone has got to do a cost benefit analysis. can you imagine the amount of money we have spent fooling around with these contractors that weren't getting the job done? can you imagine the time we have spent on this and the money that has been spent? i would like for you, general, to talk about the cost benefit of putting marines in our embassies and why in the world this is hard for us to get our arms around and where is the analysis that shows us we are saving any money. >> just to react briefly to what would be necessarily a much longer conversation. the marines are not -- that's not their
. but the person i blame the most for benghazi is president obama. it's his foreign policy strategy that aloud this conflict to become a death trap. he's the one to share the blame above all others. martha: senator mccain poibtsd out the last two seals were killed in the final hour of a 7-hour siege. it makes the argument you can't respond to the second 911 call and they can't get there in time a little more complicated, doesn't it? >> it it's a system failure. when general dempsey says the d.o.d. responded appropriately. i think not. not one d.o.d. asset reached these people for over 7 hours. i just find it dumbfounding to believe that we could not provide any military assistance on 9/11 of all days. and given the history of the threat. reports out of libya and the terror situation. this is a system failure. no one is pressing the president. the mainstream media is giving the obama administration a pass and that needs to stop. martha: we'll hear from the cia, the man who is expected to be the head of the cia, downbrennan, there is so much focus on the drone issue. i want to get your thoughts
and foreign service and domestic policy. i am also an army veteran and them currently a member of the maryland national guard. >> good for you. >> in the political crisis and the economic crisis in this country, in your speech, you've talked about "week, the people," -- "we, the people." i would like to bring up the social crisis currently. on average, members of the military commit suicide at the rate of 22 deaths per day. that is a the one death every 65 minutes. i would like to know what the department of defense and lawmakers can do to effectively address that crisis, the social problem. and also please say something about homelessness among veterans. >> yes. it is one of the most tragic issues that we deal with right now in the military. it is the growing rate of suicides that are taking place. and in some ways, they reflect the growth of suicide in the general society. part of this, there's no question in my mind that it is related to the stress of war over the last 10 years, the fact that we have deployed people time and time again, time away from their family, time away from the abilit
think barack obama has been trying to gets us out of george bush's foreign policy mistakes, but i get your point. let's go to brad in dallas. >> caller: hey. so i work in healthcare in dallas, and i heard a story -- about five years ago, a suburban doctor was going to have to close his practice because his patients were aging. more of them were getting on medicare, and he was finding that he couldn't make a profit in his practice anymore. and so -- as usual what the republicans are doing is taking something that was happening anyway and drawing a line to something in the administration. >> stephanie: right. >> caller: this hand before obamacare was even voted on. so it is going on in some places -- >> stephanie: right. some of the insurance companies are obviously racing to raise their rates before obamacare kicks in, and then people are going oh it's obamacare, see what happens. >> caller: yeah, absolutely. >> stephanie: i'm sorry i thought you saw some other cute animal. >> no. no. i'm monitoring your social media. >> stephanie: oh, thank you. how is that going
$100,000 for deviating from established policies in an emergency case. and st. mary's was fined for a surgical violation and for improperly dispensing medicine. and ucsf was fined for violating surgical procedures where foreign objects were left inside patients. each hospital has to provide a correction plan. >> some old time practices are making new technology possible at san jose state, the university aus school of journalism and mass communications today celebrated a nearly $9 million donation from what is literally an old school source. emma and jack anderson, own the printing company where the school's daily newspaper was published for 20 years. the communications business has exploded with the addition of computers and social media and they said that today's gift means that the students at san jose state will be among the best prepared in america. >>> the decision on whether to allow local the troops to create their own rules on gay membership was stalled. after a flood of comments the board said it needs more time to study and deliberate the membership policy. the group w
federal current policies as have been said make it difficult for foreign graduate students to stay on in the u.s. such immigrants from the recent decades have contributed hugely as professors and especially as entrepreneurs to our system. and our federal r&d tax credit among other things needs to be made permanent. i was asked to comment on national academies report and i want to cite three that are particularly relevant to the topic of this hearing. i start with our 2005 baseline report rising bonn the -- above the gather storm and thank the committee for supporting the authorization passage and reauthorization of the american compete act that is largely based on it. our findings and recommendations in rising above the gathering stormers relevant today as they were when they were drafted indeed you heard that from mr. temp top. it offered four broad recommendations each backed by specific evidence and twenty specific action items. but the big picture items move k-12 stem education in the us to leading position by global standards. dpubl federal investment in basic research and phy
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)